Tuesday, September 8, 2015

New Study: Work Stress Is Just As Noxious as Secondhand Smoking

Stressful working days can leave a mark on your health.


Science investigators at the Harvard Business of School in Boston and the Stanford University have joined hands to conduct a new survey on the most stressful aspects of our lives. They have analyzed 228 studies carried out in the past on work-related stress.
Job insecurity, conflicts between family and work, high job demands and long working programs were just some of the stressors that the study has taken into consideration. At the end of the research, investigators concluded that work can be just as unhealthy as secondhand smoking. Four possible health conditions have also been compared, namely, the existence of a previous medical condition, poor physical and mental health, as well as mortality.
By comparing figures, researchers have concluded that people who have very stressful jobs run 50% more risks of getting diagnosed with a medical condition. Job insecurity, on the other hand, was held responsible for a 50% increase in poor physical and mental health.
People who work longer, run greater risks of dying at an early age. The study has proven that mortality rates were 20% greater among people who worked for more than eight hours per day.
By comparing the health risks in the current study with other researches conducted in the past, scientists noticed that work stress is just as noxious as secondhand smoking. People in the two categories run the same health risks, scientists have concluded.
The American Psychological Association (APA) has confirmed that work is one of the most stressful aspects for U.S. inhabitants, right after money. 60% participants in the APA survey have confirmed that they often fear they will lose their jobs or that they will not be able to successfully accomplish all their tasks. Even more respondents have answered that they are afraid they will lose all their income.
Researchers hope their new study will be taken into consideration by work authorities, as well. They hope policymakers will address those working places where people are most stressed.

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